Max Klein on Wikidata, “botpedia” and gender classification

Max Klein defines himself on his blog as a ‘Mathematician-Programmer, Wikimedia-Enthusiast, Burner-Yogi’ who believes in ‘liberty through wikis and logic’. I interviewed him a few weeks ago when he was in the UK for Wikimania 2014. He then wrote up some of his answers so that we could share with it others. Max is a long-time volunteer of Wikipedia who has occupied a wide range of roles as a volunteer and as a Wikipedian in residence for OCLC, among others. He has been working on Wikidata from the beginning but it hasn’t always been plain sailing. Max is outspoken about his ideas and he is respected for that, as well as for his patience in teaching those who want to learn. This interview serves as a brief introduction to Wikidata and some of its early disagreements. 

Max Klein in 2011. CC BY SA, Wikimedia Commons

Max Klein in 2011. CC BY SA, Wikimedia Commons

How was Wikidata originally seeded?
In the first days of Wikidata we used to call it a ‘botpedia’ because it was basically just an echo chamber of bots talking to each other. People were writing bots to import information from infoboxes on Wikipedia. A heavy focus of this was data about persons from authority files.

Authority files?
An authority file is a Library Science term that is basically a numbering system to assign authors unique identifiers. The point is to avoid a “which John Smith?” problem. At last year’s Wikimania I said that Wikidata itself has become a kind of “super authority control” because now it connects so many other organisations’ authority control (e.g. Library of Congress and IMDB). In the future I can imagine Wikidata being the one authority control system to rule them all.

In the beginning, each Wikipedia project was supposed to be able to decide whether it wanted to integrate Wikidata. Do you know how this process was undertaken?
It actually wasn’t decided site-by-site. At first only Hungarian, Italian, and Hebrew Wikipedias were progressive enough to try. But once English Wikipedia approved the migration to use Wikidata, soon after there was a global switch for all Wikis to do so (see the announcement here).

Do you think it will be more difficult to edit Wikipedia when infoboxes are linking to templates that derive their data from Wikidata? (both editing and producing new infoboxes?)
It would seem to complicate matters that infobox editing becomes opaque to those who aren’t Wikidata aware. However at Wikimania 2014, two Sergeys from Russian Wikipedia demonstrated a very slick gadget that made this transparent again – it allowed editing of the Wikidata item from the Wikipedia article. So with the right technology this problem is a nonstarter.

Can you tell me about your opposition to the ways in which Wikidata editors decided to structure gender information on Wikidata?
In Wikidata you can put a constraint to what values a property can have. When I came across it the “sex or gender” property said “only one of ‘male, female, or intersex'”. I was opposed to this because I believe that any way the Wikidata community structure the gender options, we are going to imbue it with our own bias. For instance already the property is called “sex or gender”, which shows a lack of distinction between the two, which some people would consider important. So I spent some time arguing that at least we should allow any value. So if you want to say that someone is “third gender” or even that their gender is “Sodium” that’s now possible. It was just an early case of heteronormativity sneaking into the ontology.

Wikidata uses a CC0 license which is less restrictive than the CC BY SA license that Wikipedia is governed by. What do you think the impact of this decision has been in relation to others like Google who make use of Wikidata in projects like the Google Knowledge Graph?
Wikidata being CC0 at first seemed very radical to me. But one thing I noticed was that increasingly this will mean where the Google Knowledge Graph now credits their “info-cards” to Wikipedia, the attribution will just start disappearing. This seems mostly innocent until you consider that Google is a funder of the Wikidata project. So in some way it could seem like they are just paying to remove a blemish on their perceived omniscience.

But to nip my pessimism I have to remind myself that if we really believe in the Open Source, Open Data credo then this rising tide lifts all boats.

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